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(518) 580 - 5460

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(518) 580 - 5409

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Office Location: Ladd Hall, Room 210

DEPARTMENT CHAIR:
Michael Arnush, Professor and Chair
(518) 580 - 5463

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR:
Ruby Grande

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Fall 2012 Courses


CC 220-001 Classical Mythology
(3)  
M/W/F  11:15 – 12:20
Prof. Mechem

A study of the important myths in Greek and Roman culture, with attention to their religious, psychological, and historical origins. Comparative mythology, structural analysis, modern psychological interpretations, and the development of classical myths in Western literature and art receive attention. Fulfills Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: None.


CC 220-001 Classical Mythology (3)
M/W  4:00 - 5:20
Prof. J. Westerhold

A study of the important myths in Greek and Roman culture, with attention to their religious, psychological, and historical origins. Comparative mythology, structural analysis, modern psychological interpretations, and the development of classical myths in Western literature and art receive attention. Fulfills Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: None.

CC 225  The Ancient Novel (3)
T/TH 3:40 – 5:00
Prof. Murray

A study of ancient prose fiction with emphasis on its multi-cultural scope, the use of literature as entertainment, and the interplay of fictionality and historicity. Students will read the most important examples of ancient Greek and Roman prose fiction in translation while developing skills in literary analysis and interpretation. These include tales of extraordinary adventures, travel to distant lands, romance, and fantasy. Readings will include works by Lucian, Longus, Achilles Tatius, Apuleius, and Petronius.  Fulfills Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: None

CG 110  Elementary Greek (4)
M 10:10 – 11:05
T/TH 9:40 – 11:00
Prof. Murray

Why study ancient Greek? To study Greek is to study ourselves as creators, leaders, thinkers and as humans. Greek sharpens awareness and understanding of how languages work and offers speakers of English the opportunity to rediscover their own language; over thirty percent of all English words (particularly those of the sciences and humanities) are formed from ancient Greek roots. Students in this course will acquire the basics of Greek grammar through reading selections from a variety of authors and texts, including Aesop, Plato, Herodotus, and the New Testament.

CG 311  Plato’s Apology (4)
M/W 2:30 – 3:50
Prof. Mechem

Students will read in Greek one of the most famous and critical texts from classical antiquity – Plato’s Apology, or the refutation by Socrates of the charges brought against him in 399 BCE. Students will also examine in English other texts relevant to Socrates’ trial: Plato’s Euthyphro, Crito, and Aristophanes’ comedy, Clouds. Students will focus on the life and times of Socrates, his trial, and contemporary views of him.  Prerequisite: CG 210 or permission of the instructor.

CL 110  Elementary Latin (4)
M 10:10 - 11:05
T/TH 9:40 - 11:00
Prof. J. Westerhold

Latin, the root of the Romance languages of French, Spanish and Italian, and the language of the sciences and medicine, lies at the heart of Western civilization. The study of Latin and Roman culture leads to a greater understanding of our own literature and civilization, improves writing and reading skills, and helps to develop precise thinking. Students in this course will acquire the basics of Latin grammar and vocabulary while reading selected prose passages and poems by Cicero, Catullus, Vergil, Martial, and Caesar.
 
CL 210  Intermediate Latin (4)
M 12:20 - 1:15
T/TH  12:40 - 2:00
Prof. J. Westerhold

Students will refine their mastery of Latin grammar, syntax and vocabulary with excerpts from various Latin authors, including the commentaries of Julius Caesar. Written in the 50s BCE as observations on Caesar’s own campaigns against the people of Gaul, the “Commentaries on the Gallic Wars” provide opportunities to explore the nature of historical prose, life in the army and the provinces, the end of the Roman res publica, and the types of people Caesar conquered — particularly the Druids, whose mysterious ways both fascinated and horrified Caesar. Prerequisite: CL 110 or permission of the instructor.


CL 310  Roman Comedy (4)
T/TH 2:10 - 3:30
Prof. Porter

The Roman playwright Plautus (c. 254 - 184 BCE) is considered one of the founding fathers of Western comedy. We shall read in Latin one of Plautus’ finest and most influential plays, Rudens (The Rope), a romantic and rollicking comedy with some similarities to Shakespeare's Tempest. We shall also read in translation several other plays by Plautus and Terence, plus the one extant (almost) complete Greek new comedy, Menander's Dyscolus (The Peevish Fellow), and perhaps a post-classical comedy or two by authors such as Shakespeare and Oscar Wilde.  Prerequisite: CL 210 or permission of the instructor.
Fulfills Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: None.

HF 200-002: Classical Mythology (Honors)  (1)
W 6:30-7:30 
Prof. J. Westerhold

An exploration of the reception, incorporation, and reinterpretations of Greek mythology by Roman culture and religion. Sources and materials will include history, poetry and art from the Roman Republic and Empire. Includes an examination of important theories of mythology useful for interpreting Greek and Roman myths encountered in the course. 

HI 205 Rise of Rome (3)
M/W/F 1:25 - 2:20
Prof. Arnush

A study of Rome from its foundation by Romulus to the end of the Republic and onset of the Roman empire. Students examine the Etruscan world, the rise of Rome in Italy, the impact of Hellenism, social and political institutions in the Republic, the evolution of Roman culture, and the end of the Senatorial aristocracy. Special emphasis is given to the study of the ancient sources: literary, historiographic, archaeological, and numismatic.
Fulfills Social Sciences requirement. Prerequisite: None.

SSP 100: Sex and the Ancient City (4)
M 11:15-12:10 and T/Th 11:10-12:30
Prof. Murray

What do we know about the sexual culture of ancient city dwellers? Do modern representations of the sex lives of the inhabitants of ancient cities bear any resemblance to the cultural and historical reality? What fantasies did the ancients themselves construct about sexuality and city living, and do these fantasies cohere with our fantasies about them? Students will examine the sexual culture of the ancient Greeks, Greco-Roman Egyptians, and Romans through the study of texts, material remains, and art. Our discussions will focus on the various ways that sexuality and sexual experiences were constructed in the three major cities of the ancient Mediterranean world: Athens, Alexandria, and Rome. Students will consider how urban life in antiquity affected human sexuality, specifically how living in an ancient city organized the relationship between sex and power. We will also pay attention to the reception of the sexual culture of these ancient cities in films, television, novels, and art.  First-year Scribner Seminar.