Skidmore Center Courses - Advanced Studies

Students studying in Paris will enroll 14-17 credits per semester. Each student is required to take a French language course (exact level will be determined by a French language placement test onsite) and at least one additional course taught at the Skidmore Center. Courses offered at the Skidmore Center are taught in French unless otherwise noted.

Course numbers listed are not guaranteed and require department approval.

FALL 2013
SPRING 2014

FALL 2013
Courses are subject to change

JPFF 261 Grammar and Written French (4 credits)
Students are required to take a placement test for admission to this course. There are 4 hours of class per week. Primary attention is given to the development of oral and written language skills and to the acquisition of grammatical structures. Oral and written exposés will be based upon extra class-room activities and visits. Final grades are based upon weekly quizzes and a final examination. An initial placement test is required for admission to this course. Placement in French language course is determined by an onsite language placement exam after arrival in Paris.

JPFF 361 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3 credits)
Thorough study of French grammatical structures and nuances. This course involves intensive practice in expository writing on a wide variety of subjects. Students will analyze various French prose styles drawn from cultural, commercial, journalistic, and literary sources. They will also develop their own French prose style through exercises in sentence combination and expansion, paragraph contraction, letter writing, descriptions, reports, résumés, and commentaries. There will be frequent opportunities for students to appraise their own writing (through editing and re-writing) and that of their classmates in open seminar situations. Placement in French language course is determined by an onsite language placement exam after arrival in Paris.

JPFF 331 French Culture, Identity and the Media (3 credits)
A study of the institutions, customs, mentality, and priorities of the French people today. Today's France is defined by indigenous and foreign languages, numerous ethnicities and religions, and regional cultural diversity such as one finds in Corsica, Guadeloupe, and Martinique. The French educational system, military service, and state linguistic and cultural policies all shape the national cultural identity. However, contemporary social forces such as the depopulation of the countryside, immigration, centralization, and the world economy push to change a society still defined by social class and by cultural and regional differences. Newspapers, magazines, visual documents, on-site visits, and investigations will provide up-to-date information for discussions and for the preparation of students' dossiers and papers on a variety of subjects. Class visits include: The National Assembly, the Invalides and other monuments of historical and cultural interest in the Paris area.

JPFF 363 Monsters in Literature & Cinema (3 credits)
This course is based on the contrasting feelings of fascination and repulsion that monsters evoke. Monsters impact on the imagination is so strong that they themselves, or through “translation,” create these myths: the image of the vampire, the mad scientist, the android, the vamp, the cursed village, the gangster. But all of these characters were created in literature, before Whales, Murnau, Garnett, Land, Carné, Clouzot, and Hitchcock took hold of the stories, to say nothing of Coppola, Polanski, and others. This nebulous darkness was created in part by these characters from fantasy literature and retold through film for the first time by the German expressionists, thanks to their understanding of the science of shadows, who laid the groundwork for future films.

This course will explore, through texts and films, these monstrous myths without delving into the world of science-fiction, or horror and gore, derivatives that ultimately exploit the genre. Students will study the majority of the founding fantasy texts in French. There will be the occasional text in English, such as Dracula, but you will be asked to analyze in French. To understand the material within a larger context, students will study how the great myths have been translated into film, finding inspiration in all literature, including, English, American, French, German, etc.

JPEN 325 Text and Image (3 credits) - tentative
This course presents techniques for the analysis of images and texts. The focus is on the relations between image and text, looking at the work (specifically literature and painting) of a handful of English and American artists from the 19th and 20th centuries. Key issues include: ekphrasis, the transparency/opacity of language, disillusionment and isolation, perspectivism, spectatorship, questioning of traditional modes, representations of reality and mass culture. We will alternate between theoretical and artistic materials, applying our skills and knowledge from the theoretical works to the artistic. For each work considered, we will examine their interrelationships and their formal and conceptual inventiveness. We will also consider the wider implications (social, political and cultural) of our findings. (Taught in English)

For information about course options at partner institutions, please see the Advanced Studies course guide.


 

SPRING 2014
Courses are subject to change

JPFF 261 Grammar and Written French (4 credits)
Students are required to take a placement test for admission to this course. There are 4 hours of class per week. Primary attention is given to the development of oral and written language skills and to the acquisition of grammatical structures. Oral and written exposés will be based upon extra class-room activities and visits. Final grades are based upon weekly quizzes and a final examination. An initial placement test is required for admission to this course.

JPFF 361 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3 credits)
Thorough study of French grammatical structures and nuances. This course involves intensive practice in expository writing on a wide variety of subjects. Students will analyze various French prose styles drawn from cultural, commercial, journalistic, and literary sources. They will also develop their own French prose style through exercises in sentence combination and expansion, paragraph contraction, letter writing, descriptions, reports, résumés, and commentaries. There will be frequent opportunities for students to appraise their own writing (through editing and re-writing) and that of their classmates in open seminar situations.

JPFF 362 Advanced Grammar & Methodology (4 credits)
This course provides intensive practice in expository writing on a wide range of subjects.  Specific grammatical, idiomatic and structural points will be examined systematically as students analyze various French prose styles drawn from a selection of literary sources. They will develop their own French prose style through exercises in sentence combination and expansion, paragraph contraction, letter-writing, descriptions, reports, résumés, and commentaries.  Each student will present a brief exposé on one particular topic or author studied during the semester. This course is available only to full-year students in the spring semester that have completed JPFF 361 or at the discretion of the Resident Director.

JPFF 304 Phonetics (1 credit)
This course aims at helping the students to improve their knowledge of French phonetics in terms of perception and pronunciation. Competences of oral comprehension and expression will be also developed.

JPFF 331 French Culture, Identity and the Media (3 credits)
A study of the institutions, customs, mentality, and priorities of the French people today. Today's France is defined by indigenous and foreign languages, numerous ethnicities and religions, and regional cultural diversity such as one finds in Corsica, Guadeloupe, and Martinique. The French educational system, military service, and state linguistic and cultural policies all shape the national cultural identity. However, contemporary social forces such as the depopulation of the countryside, immigration, centralization, and the world economy push to change a society still defined by social class and by cultural and regional differences. Newspapers, magazines, visual documents, on-site visits, and investigations will provide up-to-date information for discussions and for the preparation of students' dossiers and papers on a variety of subjects. Class visits include: The National Assembly, the Invalides and other monuments of historical and cultural interest in the Paris area.

JPFF 322 Les Beurs (3 credits)
Confronting an outside look on the discussion over the “banlieue” (lower-class suburbs) and its population of French citizens of North African descent (“maghrébine”), this course provides an introduction to their distinct literature and its evolution from the 1980s to today by analyzing the discourse held between these authors (“beurs”) about their daily lives. Since their literature reflects their complex reality, students will be asked to confront the reality of their fiction. Additionally, for a more global perspective, students will watch several films, including, Mathieu Kassovtiz’s La haine (1995), Mehdi Charef’s Le thé ou harem d’Archimède (1985), Djamel Bensallah’s Neuilly sa mere (2008), and Anne Depetrini’s Il rest du jambon (2010), in addition to Farid Omri’s play Couscous aux lardons. Students will also take several trips outside the Skidmore Center to visit the Institut du Monde Arabe, la Mosquée de Paris, and a guided tour of popular quarters both inside and outside of Paris. We will use various disciplines, including historical, cultural, sociological, and linguistic, to understand how the young maghrébines act as a link between their parent’s culture and French culture, and to understand the concept of a national identity within France that incorporates the twp, which remains a hot topic among French politicians.

JPAH 251 French 19th Century Art (3 credits)
The course analyses the evolution of painting in France from the beginning to the end of the 19th century. We will study the main artistic movements in reference to the social, political, historical and philosophical context. The interdisciplinary relations of art, music and literature will also be discussed. The class will take place in house and, as often as possible, in the various Parisian museums such as the Louvre, Orsay, Orangerie, Marmotton and Delacroix museum.

JPAH 351 Paris Art & Architecture from 1750 to the present (3 credits)
This course deals with the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and their legacies, which constitute most of what we see around us in Paris today by interweaving an investigation of the city's development with a history of French architecture. The study of major monuments will include a survey of the art of their period. We will study key monuments on-site. Knowledge of French history is helpful, and a good pair of walking shoes indispensable. This course provides a thorough knowledge of the history of the city and its architecture during the periods studied. (Taught in English)

PEN 320 American Expatriate Writers (3 credits)
Students will investigate the works of American writers who chose to live in Paris for a considerable part of their creative lives and who were influenced in important ways by this city. American perceptions both of themselves and of Europeans are closely studied as are European attitudes toward Americans. Visits are conducted to places within the Paris regions specifically mentioned in the various works. Authors for particular study will include Henry James, Henry Miller, Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, and Scott Fitzgerald. (Taught in English)

JPEN 363 Metaphysical Poetry (3 credits)
This course will focus on English poems of the 17th century Metaphysical school of poetry. Exploring poetical works by John Donne, Andrew Marvell, George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, as well as Donne's sermons, we will analyze the intellectual currents that these texts reflect. Individual poems will be examined within the historical, cultural, and scientific context that gave rise to their works. (Taught in English)

For information about course options at partner institutions, please see the Advanced Studies course guide.


CREATIVE THOUGHT MATTERS
Skidmore College · 815 North Broadway · Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
© 2006 Skidmore College
http://www.skidmore.edu